We bring countries together to find ways to grow more food without growing greenhouse gas emissions.

November 30, 2016   •   News

The third annual Global Research Alliance – World Farmers Organisation Farmer Study Tour is underway in New Zealand this week (28 November – 4 December 2016). This joint activity supports the Partnership between the two organisations and was initiated to better connect the policy, science and farming sectors, and allow for the exchange of ideas and experiences to increase the skills needed to reduce agricultural greenhouse gas emissions on farm.

The Participants from Brussels, Italy, France, Argentina, Switzerland, Uruguay, Germany, and Japan are selected based on their standing within farming communities in their home country and ability to take up and share new ideas and technologies.

This year’s Tour began with a Forum, opened by the Hon Nathan Guy, Minister for Primary Industries New Zealand, discussions at the forum centred on climate change challenges for farmers and the skills, technologies and practices available or required.  The participants will then travel to the New Zealand Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Centre and Massey University in Palmerston North before visiting a dairy farm and sheep and beef farms in the lower North Island.

Related: http://wfo-oma.com/news/new-zealand-welcomed-farmers-representatives-to-the-3rd-annual-gra-wfo-farmers-study-tour.html

https://www.beehive.govt.nz/release/world-farmers-organisation-study-tour-welcomed-new-zealand

November 21, 2016   •   News

In a recent study by Wageningen University & Research Centre, management interventions to increase the supply of organic carbon were tested with a linear programming model called NutMatch.  NutMatch was applied to crop rotations with different mixtures of organic cattle slurry, pig slurry or compost, or with a mineral fertiliser. The study found that rotational crop residues, cattle slurry and compost each substantially contributed to soil organic carbon accumulation (range 200-450 kg C ha-1 yr-1); contributions of pig slurry and cover crops were small (20-50 kg C ha-1 yr-1). In terms of greenhouse gas emissions, it appears that the trade-offs between carbon inputs and emissions of greenhouse gases (notably N2O) or other pollutants (NO3, NH3) can be substantial.

Read the full article

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November 18, 2016   •   News

The International Agricultural Research Cooperation for Climate Change (the Follow-up side event of G7 Niigata Agriculture Ministers’ Meeting at the COP22, UN Climate Change Conference 2016) was held in Marrakech, Morocco on November 10th, 2016. The Government of Japan chaired the event, which followed soon after the entry into force of the Paris Agreement on November 4th, 2016. Representative stakeholders from G7 Countries (Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and United States of America) and two international organizations (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR)) attended the side event, with four international initiatives, including the GRA, the GACSA, the 4/1000 Initiative, and the Global Soil Partnership (GSP). Approximately 40 observers also attended.

Read the Chair’s Summary

Read the Chair’s Letter of Thanks

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